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Penny Pullan, co-author of Gower’s A Short Guide to Facilitating Risk Management is one of the experts being interviewed this week at the Leader’s Employee Engagement Conference  (18-22 June), so be quick don’t miss anymore of this great free event.

Best practices and insights, that would normally cost you thousands of Pounds, Euros or Dollars,  will be given directly to you, for free, in a powerful week-long conference. You can join from wherever you are. For more information and to register visit http://www.leadersemployeeengagementconference.com/

You will learn:

  • How to drive Productivity and deliver Bottom Line Results
  • How to attract and keep Top Talent
  • How to inspire your Employees to go the Extra Mile, every day
  • The Key Factors to increase Customer Loyalty
  • 5 essential Drivers to keep your Employees happily performing, now & for years to come

A Short Guide to Facilitating Risk Management

Richard Minogue (The Anatomy of Fraud and Corruption and, forthcoming, Bad Governance and Good Intent) poses a very interesting conundrum on his blog. He argues that despite paying lip service to governance, companies condone sharp practice and, worse still, some companies even mark down employees who put ethics above short-term gain.

Employee engagement can seem like rather a one-sided affair for many senior managers. Andrew Mayo’s article Finding the Right Balance offers a useful perspective on how to balance engagement on the one-hand and employee performance on the other. Andrew Mayo is author of the forthcoming Gower book Human Resources or Human Capital: Managing People as Assets.

Financial audit is an established requirement to assess the health of every company. Wouldn’t it make sense to apply a similar level of scrutiny to the quality of your strategy, after all, many troubled companies also have flawed strategies? Tony Grundy’s article in Accountancy Magazine argues the case for a strategy audit and sets out the approach you might follow. Tony Grundy is co-author of Project Management for the Pharmaceutical Industry, Revised Edition.

Jeff Gold’s inaugural lecture is well worth watching. The conundrum he refers to in the title is ‘a position where a nominated leader is expected to be a leader while power and influence are significantly distributed throughout and between organisations.’  These ideas of distributed leadership are becoming increasingly accepted as the new reality of many organizations. Jeff offers hope and help to those people expected to lead and floundering around to work out exactly what that means. He argues that leaders need to become ‘hands-on’ and ‘heads-in’, which is essentially, if I have understood his piece, active facilitators of learning and change.  Jeff Gold is co-editor of The Gower Handbook of Leadership and Management Development

Disraeli’s comment ‘Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics’ is very overquoted but only because it is so apt. Chris Murphy’s article is defintely a ‘cut out and keep’ item to help you avoid the common elephant traps when trying to interpret statistics. Whether you are trying to understand what your government is telling you; counter an argument based on spurious statistical analysis from a colleague; or trying to build a coherent business case yourself, do take a moment to read through his advice. Chris Murphy is Director of Ravensbourne Research Limited and author of Gower’s Competitive Intelligence.

Surely the first clause in the law of unintended consequences relates fairly and squarely to metrics. There can be no other area of management practice that is so important and yet is so often the cause of, sometimes business critical, unintended consequences. I have not seen Dave Zuckerman speak in public but his book Pharmaceutical Metrics is such as model of pragmatic good sense on what to measure and how to do it that I have no doubt he’s well worth listening to. He’s chairing the 6th Annual Performance Metrics and Benchmarking Summit in Philadelphia on 20th September.

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